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Ongoing Unstuck:A reading of Salman Rushdie's"The Courter"
Author(s): 
Pages: 92-96
Year: Issue:  6
Journal: Oriental Forum

Keyword:  "The Courtier"British Empire mythdisjunctiondislocationhybridization;
Abstract: Salman Rushdie's"The Courtier" was published as the ifnal contribution in Rushdie's collection entitled East, West. In it, Rushdie explores, decodes and demystiifes the misunderstandings, dilemmas and violence resulting from the break-up of the British Empire, through the creation of a microcosmic, dysfunctional, immigrant community in London in the 1960s. This article tends to examine how"The Courter"is organized around the key post-imperial elements of disjunction and dislocation and the implications of this for language and writing. The joyful and exhilarating polysemy of so many competing discourses generates a new kind of liberating narrative tension, an authenticity of hybridized voices at a time of dynamic change for England and the English language. The myths of the colonial period are shattered and dislocated. They are replaced by a hybrid national narrative that turns the nostalgic past into the disruptive‘anterior' and displaces the historical present. Rushdie, poised as he is at the intersection of past and present, myth and history, margin and center, location and dislocation, language and languages, to transform, disrupt and displace as he assists, masterfully, in the compilation of a new"hybrid national narrative".
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