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THE EXPRESSION OF TOLL—LIKE RECEPTORS IN DIFFERENT TISSUES OF LITOPENAEUS VANNAMEI AFTER CHALLENGES WITH WHITE SPOT SYNDROME VIRUS AND VIBRIO ALGINOLYTICUS
Author(s): 
Pages: 476-483
Year: Issue:  2
Journal: Oceanologia et Limnologia Sinica

Keyword:  Litopenaeus vannameiToll-like receptorreal-time PCRVibrio alginolyticusWhite Spot Syndrome Virus;
Abstract: In the present research, the expression of three types of Toll-like receptors m RNAs in different tissues of the white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, were detected with Real-time PCR. The results indicated that Toll1 was expressed in muscle, heart, haemocyte and gill with high level, while the highest expression was in the heart. Toll2 was expressed in heart, haemocyte and gill with high level and the highest expression was in the gill. Meanwhile, the highest expression of Toll3 was detected in gill. All the expressions of three types of Toll enhanced significantly after the White Spot Syndrome Virus(WSSV) challenge. The significant enhancements of three types of Toll m RNAs were observed in haemocyte after the Vibrio alginolyticus challenge and the expressions of Toll1 and Toll2 rose remarkably in gill after 3 hours and 12 hours post-V. alginolyticus challenge. Therefore, these results suggest that all the 3 types of Toll-like receptors would regulate the immunisation against the White Spot Syndrome Virus. During the V. alginolyticus infection, the immunisation in gill would be regulated by Toll1 and Toll3, while Toll2 will participate in the regulation of immunisation in haemocyte. Additionally, the expression of 3 types of Toll-like receptors significantly enhanced after 2 weeks post WSSV or Vibrio alginolyticus challenges, which might be involved in the high level of immunisation during the long-term infection.
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